Can You Work And Get SSDI Benefits? Find Out During Disability Employment Awareness Month

If you’ve had to stop working because of a health issue, the first thing you need to do is to find out if you qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits.

Then be sure to apply immediately. Your SSDI coverage, which you’ve paid for with FICA taxes, comes with important benefits.

And you can think of it as having two purposes:

  • First: To provide you with financial coverage after work stoppage due to severe disability.
  • Second: To help you return to work again, because that is part of how it’s designed.

If you have already been approved for SSDI and have medically recovered enough to return to work, finding employment can bring additional challenges. It’s likely you may need to battle with misconceptions and stereotypes that certain employers still hold about disabilities in the workplace.

One of the most common myths you may be up against is the idea that people with disabilities do not want to go back to work—it’s simply not true. In fact, more than half of all initial SSDI applicants who come to Allsup tell us they would like to work again if their conditions improve or stabilize.

Preparing for that experience of going back to work with a disability can be scary. Fortunately, with your SSDI benefits, you have resources available to support you as you transition back to working life.

During Disability Employment Awareness Month in October, SSDI recipients are encouraged to learn about and participate in the Ticket to Work program, which is operated by the Social Security Administration. Ticket to Work can offer a smooth on-ramp back into the workforce, with services that allow you test your ability to work without putting your hard-earned benefits at risk. The program offers a variety of financial incentives and free access to Social Security-approved Employment Networks (ENs) like Allsup Employment Services.

An important benefit is increasing your income, especially if you can go back to work full-time, which is likely to be much higher than the average monthly $1,197 SSDI benefit.

If you are ready to try some kind of work, while using your disability benefits, this program makes it easier to test your abilities without fear of losing SSDI and Medicare. Learn more now.

And if you are just starting out, to apply for disability benefits—don’t give up on your hope of working again. TrueHelp is here to help you envision a path to put your life and career back on track.

Learn how to apply for disability benefits, or take your first steps toward returning to work by visiting TrueHelp.com.

 

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By |2018-10-09T17:36:59+00:00October 5th, 2018|Comments Off on Can You Work And Get SSDI Benefits? Find Out During Disability Employment Awareness Month