Common Mistakes From A Social Security Disability Expert: What You Don’t Tell SSA Could Hurt You

Warning: The Social Security Administration (SSA) denies two-thirds of all initial applications for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits.

After more than 40 years working with the SSDI program, I know the primary reason for denials are common mistakes made by claimants filing on their own without the help of a professional SSDI representative. These include not properly completing an important form, or even forgetting to sign a document.

Another common error involves incomplete information on the SSA’s Activities of Daily Living questionnaire.

This all-important document asks you to describe how your impairment affects your daily life. Are you able to go shopping? Can you garden? These sound like easy questions, but be aware that the SSA is always looking for ways to deny your claim.

For example, if you answer truthfully that, yes, you can go shopping, the SSA may deny your claim for that reason alone. It may be a different outcome, however, if you mentioned that a neighbor has to drive you to the store and you must use a motorized scooter to maneuver the aisles.

It’s the same story if you say that you’re able to do some gardening. That may be true, but if you forget to add that you’re exhausted and in pain after an hour of planting flowers and you’re forced to lie down for three hours afterward, you’re not giving the SSA the information it needs.

My best advice is to always be honest with the SSA, and always give them all the information.

Remember: What you don’t tell the SSA can hurt you. A professional Social Security disability representative like Allsup can ensure that the agency will have the information it needs to make a proper decision on your claim.

I’ll have more tips on how to avoid common mistakes in a future blog.

In the meantime, click here for a free SSDI evaluation and to learn more about Allsup.

By |2018-05-07T19:21:53+00:00April 27th, 2016|Comments Off on Common Mistakes From A Social Security Disability Expert: What You Don’t Tell SSA Could Hurt You